Indigenuity: Author Caroline Wigginton in Conversation with Santiago Muñoz Arbeláez on Native Craftwork and the Art of American Literatures

Date: 13 December 2022
Time: 12-1:00 p.m. ET
Location: Zoom
Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Society of Fellows in Critical Bibliography

Join author and SoFCB Senior Fellow Caroline Wigginton and interviewer Santiago Muñoz Arbeláez for a conversation about Wigginton’s book Indigenuity: Native Craftwork and the Art of American Literatures (University of North Carolina Press, 2022). Following this conversation, the audience will have the opportunity to participate in a Q&A session moderated by Holly Borham. This event is part of a series celebrating new books in critical bibliography, and is sponsored by Rare Book School’s Andrew W. Mellon Society of Fellows in Critical Bibliography (SoFCB).

Everyone is welcome to attend this free virtual event. Advance registration is required; to register, click here. Registration closes at 10 a.m. ET the day of the event. You will receive the Zoom URL on the day of the event. Please direct any questions to Holly Borham at holly.borham@blantonmuseum.org. This event will be recorded and shared to the RBS YouTube channel.

Caroline Wigginton is Chair and Associate Professor of English at the University of Mississippi. She is the author of In the Neighborhood: Women’s Publication in Early America (University of Massachusetts Press, 2016), which received the 2018 Early American Literature Book Prize, given by UNC Press’s journal Early American Literature. With Alyssa Mt. Pleasant and Kelly Wisecup, Wigginton co-edited the award-winning joint forum on “Materials and Methods in Native and Indigenous Studies” for the William and Mary Quarterly and Early American Literature, published in 2018.

Santiago Muñoz Arbeláez is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the cofounder of Neogranadina, a Colombian non-profit organization devoted to making digitization and digital tools available to local archives and community groups in Latin America. His research and teaching focus on the interactions between Indigenous societies and empires in the early modern Atlantic world. Muñoz Arbeláez is the author of Costumbres en disputa. Los muiscas y el imperio español en Ubaque, siglo XVI (Bogotá: Ediciones Uniandes, 2016), which received honorable mention in Colombia’s National History Award. In 2021, he launched his bilingual digital humanities project Colonial Landscapes: Redrawing Andean Territories in the 17th Century, available at https://paisajescoloniales.com/ and https://colonial-landscapes.com/.

Holly Borham is a Senior Fellow in the Andrew W. Mellon Society of Fellows in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School. She is Associate Curator of Prints, Drawings, and European Art at the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin.