Kiara M. Vigil

Kiara M. Vigil

Kiara M. Vigil is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at Amherst College, where she specializes in teaching and research related to Native American Studies. She received her doctorate from the University of Michigan in American Culture, and holds master’s degrees from Dartmouth College as well as Columbia University’s Teachers College, and a bachelor’s degree from Tufts University in history. She is the past recipient of the Gaius Charles Bolin fellowship from Williams College as well as fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Autry National Museum, the Newberry Library, and the Rackham Graduate School at the University of Michigan. She has published “Red/Black Literature” in The Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literatures (co-authored with Tiya Miles), as well as “Turn of the Century Indian Intellectualism: Language and Literacy in Simon Pokagon’s Queen of the Woods” in O-gi-maw-kwe Mit-i-gwa-ki (Queen of the Woods) by Simon Pokagon (Michigan State University Press). Her first book, Indigenous Intellectuals: Sovereignty, Citizenship, and the American Imagination, 1880–1930 (Cambridge University Press) examines the cultural production of four prominent Indian intellectuals: Charles Eastman, Carlos Montezuma, Gertrude Bonnin, and Luther Standing Bear within the shifting social and political milieu of the early twentieth century. Most recently she has published articles in The Great Plains Quarterly, and has an essay forthcoming in the American Quarterly as well as a chapter titled “William Jones: Indian, Anthropologist, Murder Victim” in: Indigenous Visions: Rediscovering the World of Franz Boas (Yale University Press).

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