Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference

Biblbxd_conference_logo_small-cropiography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference to be held in Philadelphia from 12 to 15 October 2017, will bring together scholarly professionals who are poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The Bibliography Among the Disciplines program, supported by Rare Book School and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations. The project will culminate in 2019 with a volume of essays contributed by conference participants. Both the conference and subsequent volume will seek to build on the ongoing series of symposia conducted by Rare Book School’s Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography, established in 2012 through funding from the Foundation.

Conference sessions will include both traditional and innovative formats: plenary addresses, papers, short presentations, roundtables, and working groups. The conference will also include hands-on bibliographical workshops.

See the final conference program [PDF] for additional details and full schedule.

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  • Conference Schedule

    • See below for additional details about each session.

      Thursday, 12 October

      1:00–7:00 p.m.

      Conference Registration at the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts (Penn)

      Please note that Working Group members should register at the Chemical Heritage Foundation from 1:00–2:00 p.m., prior to their first meeting. All other participants should register at the Kislak Center.


      2:00–3:30 p.m.

      Concurrent Session I

      Working Group 1: Color Printing & the Global Eighteenth Century (CHF Garden I)
      Working Group 2: Globalizing Book History & Bibliography (CHF Franklin II)
      Working Group 3: Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 1: Interpreting Woodcut Print: A Global View (Kislak Center, Room 626)
      Workshop 2: The Shape of the Book (Kislak Center, Room 627)
      Workshop 3: 20 Good Questions to Ask Your Manuscript (Kislak Center, Room 625)
      Pop-Up Session 1: Critical Bibliography and Social Justice (APS, Benjamin Franklin Hall)


      3:30–4:00 p.m.

      Beverage Break


      4:00–5:30 p.m.

      Concurrent Session II

      Working Group 1: Color Printing & the Global Eighteenth Century (PMA)
      Working Group 2: Globalizing Book History & Bibliography (CHF Franklin II)
      Working Group 3: Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 4: Trade and Publishers’ Bookbindings in the Atlantic World (Kislak Center, Lea Library)
      Workshop 5: Textual Mobilities: Words, Languages, Books, and Colonial Encounters (Kislak Center, Room 625)
      Workshop 6: Building Digital Tools for Bibliographical Analysis (Vitale Media Lab, Kislak Center, Room 623)


      5:45–7:00 p.m.

      Welcome Reception at Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts (Penn)



      Friday, 13 October

      7:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

      Conference Registration at Chemical Heritage Foundation


      7:30–8:15 a.m.

      Continental Breakfast (CHF East Hall)


      8:15–8:30 a.m.

      Welcome by Rare Book School Director Michael Suarez and by conference co-chairs Barbara Heritage and Donna Sy (CHF Ullyot)


      8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Plenary Session I: Historicizing Critical Bibliography (CHF Ullyot)


      10:00–10:45 a.m.

      Beverage Break (CHF East Hall)


      10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Concurrent Session III

      Paper Session 1: Graphic Representation: Illustration & Diagrams (CHF Ullyot North)
      Paper Session 2: Textual Instruments (CHF Ullyot South)
      Roundtable 1: Learning to Read Paper Without the Text (CHF Franklin II)
      Short Presentations 1: Tools for Data Analysis & Visualization (CHF Franklin I)
      Working Group 1: Color Printing & the Global Eighteenth Century (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 7: The Business of Publishing: Reading Financial Records as a Source for the History of the Book (CHF Garden II)


      12:15–1:45 p.m.

      Lunch Break

      Pop-Up Session 2: Critical Bibliography and Social Justice: Research Strategies Exchange (12:30–1:30 p.m. in CHF Haas)


      1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Concurrent Session IV

      Paper Session 3: Questions of Scale, Production & Labor (CHF Ullyot North)
      Paper Session 4: Transmission & Transfer of Images (CHF Ullyot South)
      Roundtable 2: Performance, Textuality & Orality (CHF Franklin II)
      Short Presentations 2: Innovative Pedagogy with Material Objects (CHF Franklin I)
      Working Group 3: Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 8: Texting: Selected Bibliographical Approaches to Printing Types and Typography (CHF Garden II)


      3:15–3:45 p.m.

      Beverage Break (CHF East Hall)


      3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Concurrent Session V

      Paper Session 5: Degradation, Loss, Recovery & Fragmentation (CHF Ullyot North)
      Paper Session 6: Materiality of Digital Objects (CHF Ullyot South)
      Roundtable 3: Authorship (CHF Franklin II)
      Short Presentations 3: Teaching Illustration Processes (CHF Frankin I)
      Working Group 2: Globalizing Book History & Bibliography (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 9: Strategies of Integration: Text and Image in Wood, Metal, and Stone (CHF Garden I)
      Workshop 10: Basic Identification and Description of Bookbindings (Free Library of Philadelphia, Conference Room 405/406)
      Workshop 15: The Business of Publishing: Reading Financial Records as a Source for the History of the Book (II) (CHF Garden II)


      5:30–7:30 p.m.

      Evening Reception (Chemical Heritage Foundation)



      Saturday, 14 October

      7:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

      Conference Registration at Chemical Heritage Foundation


      7:30–8:30 a.m.

      Continental Breakfast (CHF East Hall)


      8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Concurrent Session VI

      Paper Session 7: The Social Life of Books: Uses of Text & Image Beyond Reading & Viewing (CHF Ullyot North)
      Paper Session 8: Books as Agents of Contact (CHF Ullyot South)
      Roundtable 4: Digitization, Representation & Access (CHF Franklin II)
      Short Presentations 4: Teaching Global Book History (CHF Franklin I)
      Working Group 1: Color Printing & the Global Eighteenth Century (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 11: Identification and Description of Paper (CHF Garden II)
      Workshop 13: Strategies of Integration: Text and Image in Wood, Metal, and Stone (II) (CHF Garden I)


      10:00–10:45 a.m.

      Beverage Break (CHF East Hall)


      10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Concurrent Session VII

      Paper Session 9: Manuscript in the Age of Print (CHF Ullyot North)
      Paper Session 10: Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation (CHF Ullyot South)
      Roundtable 5: Materiality as a Sustainable Humanistic Discourse (CHF Franklin II)
      Short Presentations 5: Dynamics of Digital Collections (CHF Franklin I)
      Working Group 2: Globalizing Book History & Bibliography (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 14: Identification and Description of Paper (II) (CHF Garden II)


      12:15–1:45 p.m.

      Lunch Break

      Pop-Up Session 3: Critical Bibliography and Social Justice: Pedagogy Strategies Exchange (12:30–1:30 p.m. in CHF Haas)


      1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Concurrent Session VIII

      Paper Session 11: Comparative Histories of the Book (CHF Ullyot North)
      Paper Session 12: Reappraising the Redundant: The Value of Copies in the Study of Textual Artifacts (CHF Ullyot South)
      Roundtable 6: Ethics & Responsibility in the Bibliosphere (CHF Franklin II)
      Short Presentations 6: The Book and Its Time: Developing a ‘Period Eye’ (CHF Franklin I)
      Working Group 3: Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines (CHF Haas)
      Workshop 12: Editing Among the Disciplines (CHF Garden I)


      3:15–3:45 p.m.

      Beverage Break (CHF East Hall)


      3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Plenary Session II: The Future of the Past: Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age (CHF Ullyot)


      5:30–7:00 p.m.

      Evening Reception (Chemical Heritage Foundation)



      Sunday, 15 October

      10:00–11:30 a.m.

      Affinity Brunch (CHF Ullyot & East Hall)


      11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

      Plenary Session III: “Bibliography Among the Disciplines” Community Plenary (CHF Ullyot)


      1:00–1:15 p.m.

      Closing remarks by Rare Book School Director Michael Suarez, conference co-chairs Barbara Heritage and Donna Sy, and SoFCB President Stephanie Ann Frampton (CHF Ullyot)

  • Plenary Sessions

    • 1. Historicizing Critical Bibliography

      Friday, 13 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Anthony Grafton (Princeton University)
      “Bio-Bibliography in Early Modern Europe: Towards a History of Practice”

      François Deroche (Chair in the History of the Qur’an, Text and Transmission, Collège de France)
      “From One Giant to Another: Bio-Bibliographical Practice in the Islamic World (10th–17th Centuries)”

      Session Organizers: Vera Keller (University of Oregon), Yael Rice (Amherst College)


      2. The Future of the Past: Cultural Heritage in the Digital Age

      Saturday, 14 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Nancy Y. McGovern (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
      “Making Digital Practice Work for Our Collections”

      W. Brent Seales (University of Kentucky)
      “Emergent Practices for Non-Invasive Analysis of Artifacts”

      Session Organizer: Stephanie Ann Frampton (MIT)


      3. “Bibliography Among the Disciplines” Community Plenary

      Sunday, 15 October, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

      Session Organizers: András Kiséry (The City College of New York) and Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)

      Where do we go from here? This final plenary will feature multiple speakers—conference participants from a range of professions and disciplines—responding to this question. As a community conversation, this plenary will provide an opportunity for all participants to reflect on insights from the conference, further questions, and future projects.

  • Paper Sessions

    • 1. Graphic Representation: Illustration & Diagrams

      Friday, 13 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Claire Eager (University of Virginia)
      Moderator: Michael Sappol (Independent scholar, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study)

      Holly Borham (Princeton University)
      “Itinerant Images: Crossing Boundaries of Confession, Geography, and Media in Early Modern Germany”

      Michael Patrick Kuczynski (Tulane University)
      “Imaging Monasticism: The St. Gall Plan as a Meditative Object”

      Meekyung MacMurdie (University of Chicago)
      “Proven Recipes: Text, Image, and Diagram in Arabic Medical Manuscripts”

      Fabienne Moore (University of Oregon)
      “Gustave Doré’s Histoire de la Sainte Russie (1854): The Invention of Graphic Rhetoric or the Artist At War”


      2. Textual Instruments

      Friday, 13 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Nick Wilding (Georgia State University)
      Moderator: Ann Blair (Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor of History and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Harvard University)

      Ivana Horacek (University of Minnesota)
      “Instrumental Images and Gifts of Knowledge: Stars, Books, and Instruments”

      Jennifer Nelson (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
      “Basilischco, Elifanntto, Tiruno: The Holzschuher War Machines Revisited”

      Suzanne Karr Schmidt (The Newberry)
      “Making Time and Space: Collecting Early Modern Printed Instruments”

      E.R.Truitt (Bryn Mawr College)
      “The Necessity of Invention: Roger Bacon’s Speculative Technology”


      3. Questions of Scale, Production & Labor

      Friday, 13 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Juliet Sperling (University of Pennsylvania)
      Moderator: Suzanne Karr Schmidt (George Amos Poole III Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts, The Newberry)

      Megan Cook (Colby College)
      “Craven Ord’s Brass Rubbings: Size, Scope, and Scale in Antiquarian Practice”

      Will Hansen (The Newberry)
      “Extra-Illustrated Editions: The Case of Irving’s Life of George Washington, 1889”

      Lauren Williams (University of Toronto)
      “Uncovering the Saint Cuthbert Gospel Binding”


      4. Transmission & Transfer of Images

      Friday, 13 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Aaron M. Hyman (Johns Hopkins University)
      Moderator: Kathryn Rudy (Director of Research, School of Art History, University of St. Andrews)

      David A. Brewer (Ohio State University)
      “Copies, Transfers, and Excerpts; or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Derivative”

      Elizabeth Bacon Eager (Southern Methodist University)
      “John Jenkins’s Ingenious Mechanics: The Visual and Physical Construction of Authorship in Early America”

      Roger Gaskell (Roger Gaskell Rare Books)
      “Newton and Cotes; London and Cambridge”


      5. Degradation, Loss, Recovery & Fragmentation

      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Jane Raisch (University of York)
      Moderator: Arthur Bahr (Associate Professor of Literature, Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

      Niv Allon (Metropolitan Museum of Art)
      “Gem wesh (found missing): Representing Ancient Fragmentary Texts and Their Lacunae”

      Kristopher Driggers (University of Chicago)
      “Manuscript Alteration and Stylistic Evolution: Why Codex Durán Kept its Changes Visible”

      Megan Heffernan (DePaul University)
      “‘Filthy, Tattered, and Torn’: Disbound Manuscripts and the History of Waste”

      Clare Mullaney (University of Pennsylvania)
      “Dickinson’s Fragments: Limitation, Constraint, and an Early History of Print Disability”


      6. Materiality of Digital Objects

      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)
      Moderator: Matthew G. Kirschenbaum (Professor, Department of English, University of Maryland)

      Meaghan Brown (Folger Shakespeare Library) & Jessica Otis (Carnegie Mellon University Library)
      “Name That Book: Identifying Digital Objects During Research and Discovery”

      Alan Galey (University of Toronto)
      “Bibliography for a Used Future: What Bibliographical Methods Can Teach Us About Digital Artifacts (and Vice Versa)”

      Rieke Jordan (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main)
      “The Analog/Digital File”


      7. The Social Life of Books: Uses of Text & Image Beyond Reading & Viewing

      Saturday, 14 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Session Organizers: Aaron M. Hyman (Johns Hopkins University), Hannah Marcus (Harvard University), Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)
      Moderator: Leah Price (Francis Lee Higginson Professor of English Literature, Harvard University)

      Melissa Reynolds (Rutgers University)
      “Consuming the Word: Late Medieval Medical Charms and the Curative Power of Writing”

      Kathryn Rudy (University of St. Andrews)
      “Touching Skin: Why Medieval Readers Rubbed and Kissed their Manuscripts”

      Fan Wang (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
      “The Uses, Abuses, and Misuses of Books in Early Modern China”


      8. Books as Agents of Contact

      Saturday, 14 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Session Organizers: Hansun Hsiung (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science), András Kiséry (The City College of New York), Yael Rice (Amherst College)
      Moderator: Isabel Hofmeyr (Professor of African Literature, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Global Distinguished Professor of English, New York University)

      John R. Blakinger (University of Southern California)
      “The Book as Agent of Interstellar Contact: The Voyager Record/The EchoStar XVI  Artifact”

      David Mervart (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain)
      “A Kyūshū Warlord’s Favorite French Anthology: The Many Lives of a Text”

      Priyasha Mukhopadhyay (Harvard University)
      “Plagiarism as Cultural Contact: The Case of the Theosophical Society”


      9. Manuscript in the Age of Print

      Saturday, 14 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizers: Rachael King (University of California, Santa Barbara) & Marissa Nicosia (Penn State University, Abington College)
      Moderator: Margaret J.M. Ezell (Distinguished Professor of English and John and Sara Lindsey Chair of Liberal Arts, Texas A&M University)

      Mimi Ensley (University of Notre Dame)
      “Manuscript, Romance, and the Visual Language of Print”

      Emily Friedman (Auburn University)
      “Manuscripts and Metadata: Taxonomizing Manuscript Fiction in the Age of Print”

      Samyak Ghosh (Columbia University)
      “The Past in the Scriptorium: Manuscripts, Print, and Literacy in Colonial Northeast India”

      Alex Hidalgo (Texas Christian University)
      “Bicephalous Between the Pages”


      10. Reading the Whole Book: Object Interpretation

      Saturday, 14 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizers: Lauren Jennings (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) & Elizaveta Strakhov (Marquette University)
      Moderator: Stephen Nichols (Professor Emeritus and Research Professor; James M. Beall Professor Emeritus of French and Humanities, Johns Hopkins University)

      Ellen Handy (The City College of New York, CUNY)
      “The Art of Ethnography in Photogravure: Reading Julia Peterkin and Doris Ullmann’s Roll, Jordan, Roll in Material Terms”

      Sarah Peters Kernan (Independent scholar)
      “Reading the Whole Book: Cookbooks in Late Medieval English Professional Manuscripts”

      Douglas Mark Klahr (University of Texas at Arlington)
      “Ambiguous Containers of Propaganda: Paradoxes of Nazi Stereoscopic Photo Books”

      Tara Lyons (Illinois State University)
      “Reading the Whole Play Collection: Seneca Beyond the Commonplace”


      11. Comparative Histories of the Book

      Saturday, 14 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizers: Megan McNamee (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts) & Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)
      Moderator: Will Noel (Director of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts and Director of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania)

      Melissa Adler (Western University – London)
      “A Book is Being Cataloged”

      Paul Dilley (University of Iowa)
      “Cultural and Textual Exchanges: The Manuscript Across Pre-Modern Eurasia”

      Amy Holmes-Tagchungdarpa (Occidental College)
      “Decentering Himalayan Buddhist Book History: The Influence of Location and Peripherality in the Creation of Innovations in Book Technology”

      Birgit Brander Rasmussen (Binghamton University)
      “From History of the Book to History of the Awikighan: A Native American Studies Approach to Comparative Book History”


      12. Reappraising the Redundant: The Value of Copies in the Study of Textual Artifacts

      Saturday, 14 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Katherine Mintie (DePauw University)
      Moderator: David Whitesell (Curator, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia)

      Kristin Jensen (University of Virginia)
      “Discovering Unique Specimens in Print Collections: Lessons from Book Traces @ UVA”

      Jim Kuhn (Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin)
      “Portraits and Principles in Multiples”

      Adrienne Lundgren (Library of Congress)
      “Rewards of Redundancy: Recognizing the Research Value of Nineteenth-Century Photograph Manuals”

      Bryan Sinche (University of Hartford)
      “Redundancy is the Point: Nineteenth Century African American Literature in Motion”

  • Roundtables

    • 1. Hands-on Demonstration – Learning to Read Paper Without the Text

      Friday, 13 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Timothy Barrett (University of Iowa)

      What can the paper alone tell us, without attention to the written or printed text, even without watermark evidence? What does the sheet alone have to say? University of Iowa paper specialist and MacArthur Fellow Timothy Barrett will offer a special live papermaking demonstration, PowerPoint presentation, and extended open discussion during which he will make the case that attention to various characteristics of the paper itself can provide clues about the papermaker’s skill level and thus the quality and relative price of the finished sheet. This “reading” in turn may prove helpful to scholars eager to learn about the intended audience for the finished book, or for the intended message in the written letter or manuscript.


      2. Performance, Textuality & Orality

      Friday, 13 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Glenda Goodman (University of Pennsylvania)
      Moderator: Kate van Orden (Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of Music, Harvard University)

      Bethany Cencer (Crane School of Music, State University of New York at Potsdam)
      “Imagining Aurality in Smart’s Vocal Pocket Companion

      Andrew Ferguson (University of Virginia)
      “Catching Them All: Videogame Performance and the Bibliography of Play”

      Leslie Gay, Jr. (University of Tennessee)
      “Shadows of Black and White: Materialities and Medialities in May Irwin’s ‘Frog Song’”

      Laura Helton (Pennsylvania State University)
      “The Bibliographical Afterlives of ‘Unwritten Histories’”

      Jesse Karlsberg (Emory University)
      “Surfacing Race, Place, and Modernity in the Performance of Shape-note Musical Texts through an Ethnobibliographical Approach”


      3. Authorship

      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Session Organizers: András Kiséry (The City College of New York) & Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)
      Moderator: Matt Cohen (Associate Professor of English, University of Nebraska-Lincoln)

      Katy Chiles (University of Tennessee)
      “Alternative Black Authorship”

      Molly Des Jardin (University of Pennsylvania)
      “Rethinking the Oeuvre: Modern Japanese Periodicals as Corporate Authors”

      Sonja Drimmer (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
      “Undeciding the Author in the Illuminated Manuscript of Middle English Verse”

      Zachary Lesser (University of Pennsylvania)
      “Shakespeare as Author and Apocrypha”

      Michelle Levy (Simon Fraser University) & Kandice Sharren (Simon Fraser University)
      “Beyond Authorship: Professional Networks and the Women’s Print History Project”

      Chad Wellmon (University of Virginia)
      “Print and the Invention of Philosophy Around 1800”


      4. Digitization, Representation & Access

      Saturday, 14 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Session Organizers: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University) & Sonia Hazard (Franklin & Marshall College)
      Moderator: Rebecca Hankins (Associate Professor and Archivist/Librarian of Africana Studies and Women’s & Gender Studies, Texas A&M University)

      Dan Blim (Denison University)
      “The Complete Package: Reissuing Albums, Reshaping Histories”

      Eleanor Jane Reeds (University of Connecticut)
      “Digitizing the Corpus: Responsible Representations of Female Bodies in Literary Archives”

      Charles R. Welsko (West Virginia University)
      “Raising the Buried Voices: Nineteenth-Century African-Americans and Digital Archives”

      Sarah Werner (Rockville, MD)
      “Collaborating for an Accessible Past”


      5. Materiality as a Sustainable Humanistic Discourse

      Saturday, 14 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizers: Dahlia Porter (University of Glasgow) & Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)
      Moderator: Heather Wolfe (Curator of Manuscripts, Folger Shakespeare Library)

      Erika Mary Boeckeler (Northeastern University)
      “The Linguistic Biases of Descriptive Bibliography”

      Raina Joines (University of North Texas)
      “The Scholar’s Art:  Making & Mining Material Artifacts”

      Robert Riter (University of Alabama)
      “Engaging and Representing Scientific Data through Book Art”

      Todd Victor Samuelson (University of Utah)
      “Lexical Substrate: The Materiality of Language in the History of the Book”

      Leslie Smith (Winston-Salem, NC)
      “From Wonder to New Artwork”

      Simran Thadani (San Francisco, CA)
      “Rare Books Beyond the Ivory Tower”


      6. Ethics & Responsibility in the Bibliosphere

      Saturday, 14 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Claire Eager (University of Virginia)
      Moderator: Katherine Reagan (Assistant Director for Collections & Ernest L. Stern Curator of Rare Books & Manuscripts, Cornell University)

      Jeremy Dibbell (Rare Book School)
      “Announcing Major Acquisitions: A Responsibility”

      Eliza Gilligan (University of Virginia)
      “Through the Fold: Choices in Book Conservation and the Impact on the Social History of the Book”

      Nina Musinsky (Musinsky Rare Books)
      “Artifacts or Time Machines? Examples from the Field”

      Elizabeth Ott (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
      “Ethical Collecting in Special Collections Librarianship”

      Todd Pattison (Northeast Document Conservation Center)
      “A Profitable Examination: The Binding of Six Months in a Convent

      Setsuko Yokoyama (University of Maryland, College Park)
      “Negotiating Open Access for All Interested Parties”

  • Short Presentations

    • 1. Tools for Data Analysis & Visualization

      Friday, 13 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Ryan Cordell (Northeastern University)
      Moderator: Meredith L. McGill (Associate Professor of English, Rutgers University)

      Kathryn Desplanque (Duke University)
      “Accountable Note-Taking: Qualitative Data Analysis Software as an Augmented Personal Research Tool”

      Alessandra Panzanelli Fratoni (University of Oxford; The British Library) & Matilde Malaspina (University of Oxford, Lincoln College)
      “Visual Recognition, Image-matching and Digital Annotation: Early Printed Book Illustrations within the 15cBOOKTRADE Project”

      Elyse Graham (The State University of New York, Stony Brook University)
      “Database Thinking and Deep Description: Designing a Digital Archive of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS)”

      Rebecca Hankins (Texas A&M University)
      “A Catalyst for Social Activism: The Digital Black Bibliographic Project at Texas A&M University”

      Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania)
      “VisColl: Visualizing the Physical Structure of Medieval Manuscripts”


      2. Innovative Pedagogy with Material Objects

      Friday, 13 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Elizabeth Yale (University of Iowa)
      Moderator: Michael F. Suarez, S.J. (Director, Rare Book School; Professor of English, University Professor, Hon. Curator of Special Collections, University of Virginia)

      Rhae Lynn Barnes (University of Southern California; Princeton University) & Stephanie Elizabeth Beck Cohen (Indiana University)
      “Stitched Histories of Government & Grief: Teaching Quilts as Texts in the Black Transatlantic”

      Kyle Dugdale (Yale School of Architecture)
      “Bibliographical Architectures”

      Adam Hooks (University of Iowa)
      “How Does It Work and Why Is It Here? Teaching Text as Technology”

      Rebecca Wingfield (Stanford University)
      “Hearing the Voices of the Past: Teaching with Audio Recordings of Allen Ginsberg’s ‘Howl’”


      3. Hands-on Demonstration – Teaching with Stuff: Building Bibliographical Collections at Rare Book School with Limited (or no) Financial Resources; or, Necessity Is the Mother of Invention

      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Session Presenter: Terry Belanger (Founding Director, Rare Book School, University of Virginia), with Barbara Heritage (Rare Book School)

      Teaching bibliography requires intensive hands-on work with books as physical objects and other various print-related artifacts. At the same time, resources at many institutions are limited for this kind of pedagogy. In this hands-on presentation session, Rare Book School’s Founding Director, Terry Belanger, will draw on his extensive work in forming RBS’s teaching collections to discuss practical, low-cost solutions for teaching bibliography in a classroom setting. Using examples from RBS’s collections with the assistance of the School’s Curator, Barbara Heritage, Belanger will discuss and demonstrate a variety of approaches to building teaching collections and kits. The session will conclude with an extended Q&A.


      4. Teaching Global Book History

      Saturday, 14 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Session Organizers: Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University) & Ben Nourse (University of Denver)
      Moderator: Joseph Howley (Associate Professor of Classics, Columbia University)

      Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University)
      “Stone, Wood, Copper, Lead: The Multimedial Adventures of the Xi’an Nestorian Stele in the 17th-Century World”

      Florence C. Hsia & Robin Rider (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
      “Traduttore, Traditore: What’s in a Translation?”

      Chris Hunter (California Institute of Technology)
      “The American Instructor: Teaching Minds and Hands in Colonial America”

      Bryan C. Keene (J. Paul Getty Museum and Courtauld Institute of Art)
      “Manuscripts and the Global Middle Ages”

      Holly Shaffer (Brown University)
      “Edward Moor’s The Hindu Pantheon (1810)”


      5. Dynamics of Digital Collections

      Saturday, 14 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Paul Fyfe (North Carolina State University) & Zachary Hines (The University of Texas at Austin)
      Moderator: Alex Gil (Digital Scholarship Coordinator, Humanities and History Division, Columbia University Libraries)

      Lindsay DiCuirci (University of Maryland) & Molly Hardy (American Antiquarian Society)
      “Serials Cataloging and Alternative Access in the Classroom, or the Making of Mill Girls in Nineteenth-Century Print”

      Fenella France (Library of Congress)
      “The Digital Cultural Object: New Digital Layers for Document and Object Archaeology”

      Margaret Hagerty Gamm (University of Iowa)
      “The Global Manuscript and the Digital Boutique”

      Jessica Savage (Princeton University)
      “Dynamics of a Digital Art History Collection: Index of Christian Art 2.0”


      6. The Book and Its Time: Developing a ‘Period Eye’

      Saturday, 14 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Session Organizer: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Winterthur Museum)
      Moderator: Catharine Dann Roeber (Assistant Professor of Decorative Arts and Material Culture at the Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library)

      Gabriella Angeloni (University of South Carolina) & Molly Bruce Patterson (Newport Historical Society)
      “William Ellery as Reader at the Newport Historical Society”

      David Brewer (Ohio State University)
      “Objects under Pressure”

      Brad Eden (Valparaiso University)
      “The Library of Michael H. R. Tolkien: A Snapshot of Twentieth-Century British Politics and Culture”

      Alea Henle (Western New Mexico University)
      “Books and their Histories: Sources Survival in Historical Scholarship”

      Eric Holzenberg (The Grolier Club of New York)
      “The Aesthetic Movement in Print & Beyond”

  • Working Groups

    • The core participants of the three working groups were pre-selected in 2016. If you missed the CFP at that time and would like to inquire about the possibility of auditing one of the working group sessions, please submit a request using this form. Please note that due to space limitations, submission of a request does not guarantee entry. Working group organizers will make discretionary decisions about admitting additional participants.

      1. Color Printing & the Global Eighteenth Century

      Thursday, 12 October, 2:00–3:30 p.m., 4:00–5:30 p.m.
      Friday, 13 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.
      Saturday, 14 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Working Group Organizers: Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Winterthur Museum) & Jeannie Kenmotsu (Portland Museum of Art)
      Moderators: Julie Nelson Davis (Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania); James Green (Librarian, the Library Company of Philadelphia); & Shelley Langdale (Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings, Philadelphia Museum of Art)

      Participants:

      Timothy Clifford (University of Pennsylvania)

      Michelle Moseley-Christian (Virginia Tech)

      Iris Moon (Pratt Institute)

      Holly Shaffer (Brown University)

      Henry Smith, II (Columbia University)

      Ad Stijnman (Independent scholar)


      2. Globalizing Book History & Bibliography

      Thursday, 12 October, 2:00–3:30 p.m., 4:00–5:30 p.m.
      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.
      Saturday, 14 October, 10:45–12:15 p.m.

      Working Group Organizers: Hwisang Cho (Xavier University), Ben Nourse (University of Denver), Rachel Stein (Columbia University in the City of New York)
      Moderator: Brinkley Messick (Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University)

      Participants:

      Daniela Bleichmar (University of Southern California)

      Julie R. Enszer (Independent scholar and poet)

      Devin Fitzgerald (Harvard University)

      A. Mitchell Fraas (University of Pennsylvania)

      Natasha Heller (University of Virginia)

      Florence C. Hsia (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

      Bryan C. Keene (J. Paul Getty Museum and Courtauld Institute of Art)

      Shobna Nijhawan (York University)

      Neil Safier (Brown University)

      Emma Smith (Hertford College at the University of Oxford)

      Joshua Byron Smith (University of Arkansas)

      Caitlin Tyler-Richards (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

      Lindsay Van Tine (University of Pennsylvania and Swarthmore College)

      Corinna Zeltsman (Georgia Southern University)


      3. Resembling Science: The Unruly Object Across the Disciplines

      Thursday, 12 October, 2:00–3:30 p.m., 4:00–5:30 p.m.
      Friday, 13 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.
      Saturday, 14 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Working Group Organizers: Meghan Doherty (Berea College), Dahlia Porter (University of Glasgow), Courtney Roby (Cornell University)
      Moderator: Lucia Dacome (Associate Professor, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, University of Toronto)

      Participants:

      Emily R. Anderson (University of Southern California, Los Angeles)

      Elizabeth Athens (Worcester Art Museum)

      Sarah Basham (University of British Columbia)

      Mungo Campbell (University of Glasgow)

      Michelle DiMeo (Chemical Heritage Foundation)

      Carey Gibbons (Independent scholar)

      Cheryl Knott (University of Arizona, Tucson)

      Mary Learner (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

      Elizabeth Neswald (Brock University)

      Reviel Netz (Stanford University)

      Robin E. Rider (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

      Sarah Scripps (University of Wisconsin)

  • Workshops

    • All workshops are currently full. To join the waiting list, please fill out the Workshop Registration Form.

      1. Interpreting Woodcut Print: A Global View

      Thursday, 12 October, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

      The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania

      Instructor: Julie Davis (University of Pennsylvania)

      In this workshop, we will use close looking as a practice to deepen our understanding of the printed image and page, by investigating selected works from the Kislak Center collection. We’ll begin by making careful studies of selected examples and then go beyond looking in our hands-on engagement of printed works from Europe, the Americas, and East Asia to make comparisons across and beyond borders.

      Our focus will be on the print medium used around the globe in the early modern period: the woodcut. We will begin by thinking about technique and agency, asking how the same basic technology of printing from carving raised lines in a piece of wood was adapted for local contexts and uses. What clues can be detected in the printed work that are part of this record of selection and adaptation? Who were the contributors to the printed image and how was this authorship represented? We will also think about the limits and benefits of using this medium. Why, for example, did the woodcut remain the preferred medium for printing text in some locales while in others movable type became the standard? How was color incorporated into printing and why? What was necessary for other materials, beyond the woodblock, for this medium to flourish?

      The workshop will include opportunities to develop handling skills for a variety of media. It will also include modern copies that challenge our ability to determine the difference between a period work and its reproduction. There will be lots of looking and hands-on opportunities.

      Workshop sponsored by the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.


      2. The Shape of the Book

      Thursday, 12 October, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

      The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania

      Instructors: Paul Needham (Princeton University) & Will Noel (University of Pennsylvania)

      This workshop will discuss the importance of paper size and format in understanding the book, whether in script or print. Taking the fifteenth-century book as our case study, we will demonstrate the 64 possible sizes and shapes of books made of paper in the fifteenth century. We will instruct people how to recognize sizes and formats for this period, and will introduce them to a tool that will help participants diagnose the size and formats of books that they will examine themselves. The workshop will also discuss the size and shape of fifteenth-century single sheets, whether manuscript, printed, or drawn. In addition, we will explore the sizes and formats of parchment books. Participants specializing in books from other periods and regions are welcome.

      Workshop sponsored by the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.


      3. 20 Good Questions to Ask Your Manuscript

      Thursday, 12 October, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

      The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania

      Instructor: Heather Wolfe (Folger Shakespeare Library)

      This workshop will introduce participants to the essential questions you need to keep in mind when researching a manuscript from any time period and place. After speed dating several physical and digitized manuscripts from the Kislak Center, we will discuss the strengths and limitations of basing our research on each format, and will develop additional questions to ask of manuscripts depending on their date and place of production, genre, and substrate. A bibliography will be developed based on the interests of the participants. Please bring laptops.

      Workshop sponsored by the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.


      4. Trade and Publishers’ Bookbindings in the Atlantic World

      Thursday, 12 October, 4:00–5:30 p.m.

      The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania

      Instructor: James N. Green (Library Company of Philadelphia)

      This workshop will examine the different styles, materials, and structures used in bookbindings commissioned by booksellers and publishers in Great Britain and North America from about 1690 to 1860. It is intended to help bibliographers, catalogers, booksellers, and collectors distinguish original bindings from bespoke bindings and from later rebindings, and to consider appropriate terminology for their description.  We will also discuss such questions as: when books were bound in the course of their progress from printer to bookseller to customer, and how that varied over time and in different places; when the practice of edition binding began, and how to define it; and what were the origins of cloth case binding. We will also consider the circulation of unbound or partially bound books and pamphlets. Handouts will include reproductions of the various kinds of archival sources that are pertinent to these questions. Standard sources on the history of bookbinding and book design will be discussed and available for inspection, but the emphasis of the workshop will be on what they can tell us about the history of publishing, bookselling, and reading. Participants will have the opportunity to look closely at a wide variety of bindings from the collections of the University of Pennsylvania and the Library Company of Philadelphia. An assortment of bookbinding tools and equipment and some instructional sample bindings made by Library Company conservator Jennifer Rosner will also be on hand.

      Workshop sponsored by the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.


      5. Textual Mobilities: Words, Languages, Books, and Colonial Encounters

      Thursday, 12 October, 4:00–5:30 p.m.

      The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania

      Instructor: John Pollack (University of Pennsylvania)

      This seminar draws upon themes addressed in the 2016 RBS course “Textual Mobilities: Works, Books, & Reading across Early Modern Europe” (taught by Roger Chartier and John Pollack). Our session will focus on words, vocabularies, dialogues, dictionaries, grammars, and other forms that circulated in Europe and the Americas in the wake of 1492. Taking for our case study the languages of the Native peoples of the Americas as they circulated into and around European languages, we will explore highly contested terms like “cannibal,” whose origin can be traced to this moment. More generally, we will discuss how bibliographical methods and analytical approaches can help us study the movements of languages and their speakers across and beyond borders. Kislak Center collections will be examined, and seminar participants are encouraged to share their own research on related questions, including work on based on other regions and periods.

      Workshop sponsored by the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.


      6. Building Digital Tools for Bibliographical Analysis

      Thursday, 12 October, 4:00–5:30 p.m.

      The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania

      Instructor: Dot Porter (University of Pennsylvania)

      In this workshop, we will discuss how to build tools that use technology to aid bibliographical analysis. We will begin by looking at a variety of materials in different formats and from a range of periods, and we will talk about what aspects of their physicality we might be able to uncover or evaluate using digital technologies. The materials we will use will depend to some extent on the interests of the group, but our initial plan is to include an early Western codex, a non-European codex, a scroll from Europe, a scroll from Thailand, an early printed book, a collection of handwritten letters, and a modern artist’s book. Next, we will look at a number of existing tools and methods, focusing on how their functionality assists with different aspects of bibliographical analysis. As a group or in teams (depending on the size of the workshop) we will brainstorm a new tool.

      Workshop sponsored by the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, University of Pennsylvania.


      7. The Business of Publishing: Reading Financial Records as a Source for the History of the Book

      Friday, 13 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: Michael Winship (The University of Texas at Austin)

      This workshop will introduce participants to the use and interpretation of publishers’ and book trade archives and other records as a source for the study of the creation, production, distribution, and reception of books and other printed materials. Although the focus will be on American publishing from the colonial period to the twentieth century, British practice may also be addressed if students desire. The workshop is chiefly aimed at scholars who are engaged in book historical research, but will also be of use to librarians, collectors, and others whose interests or responsibilities would benefit from an understanding and knowledge of the archives and records that document the history of American and British book production and publishing.


      8. Texting: Selected Bibliographical Approaches to Printing Types and Typography

      Friday, 13 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: David Whitesell (University of Virginia)

      This workshop offers an introduction to: 1) the diversity of typographical material available to printers during the hand-press period, 2) selected bibliographical methods for analyzing printing types and typographical features, and 3) ways of applying insights derived from these methods to broader questions. Topics may include the concept of type font; compiling type synopses; the recurrence within a publication of damaged type sorts; spacing material and bearer type; and non-textual fonts and ornaments. Macro-bibliographical approaches will also be covered, e.g., tracing changes in typographical features over time, and the use of typographical features to localize and date unidentified or false imprints. Hands-on exercises will include: 1) identifying and evaluating the font used to set a 17th-century English imprint, and 2) identifying the likely place of printing of a hand-press period book bearing a false imprint.


      9. Strategies of Integration: Text and Image in Wood, Metal, and Stone

      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: Roger Gaskell (Roger Gaskell Rare Books)

      The relationship between text and image is an aspect of book design of huge significance in almost all kinds of books. Whether we are concerned with devotional texts, emblems and alchemy, science, medicine, natural history, travel, imaginative, or technical literature, the ways that text and image work together to make meaning is dependent on the technical possibilities of printing from wood, metal, and stone.

      Considering the choices made by authors/publishers/printers in putting books together, the ways that the worked with, or against the available technologies, we can learn how the relationship between text and image was understood in the time that the books were produced. Bookmakers went to considerable trouble and expense to bring text and image together in various ways, yet we rarely now read them together as a single entity.
      Participants will look at a range of books from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries alongside examples of woodblocks, copperplates, and lithographic stones. We will ask not only how the books were made, but why in each context the particular methods of printing and integration were chosen and what this tells us about the intentions of the bookmakers and their anticipated audience.


      10. Basic Identification and Description of Bookbindings

      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      The Free Library of Philadelphia

      Instructor: Jan Storm van Leeuwen (Independent Scholar)

      This workshop will introduce participants to the basic principles of describing bookbindings, including key terminology essential to the field. The workshop will focus on the most important bookbinding materials and techniques that have been used historically and used at present, and will help the participants in recognizing them. They will be able to test their knowledge with bindings from the rich holdings of the Free Library of Philadelphia.

      Workshop sponsored by the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia and the Free Library of Philadelphia.


      11. Identification and Description of Paper

      Saturday, 14 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: John Bidwell (The Morgan Library & Museum)

      This workshop will present a summary overview of techniques bibliographers have used to describe paper in the handpress period. Participants will learn some of the traditional terms indicating size, quality, handling properties, and surface characteristics. They will examine complete sheets of early paper to see how those terms can be applied. The specimen sheets will be mainly writing, drawing, and ledger papers made in England and France between the seventeenth and nineteen centuries.

      There will be a short discussion of different methods of recording watermarks for the purpose of dating, localizing, and authenticating books and manuscripts. Significant developments in this field will be noted with case studies such as Allan Stevenson’s The Problem of the Missale Speciale. Participants will compare different types of watermark dictionaries, including standard reference works by Briquet and Heawood and national histories with watermark supplements, such as Henk Voorn’s history of papermaking in Holland and Alfred Shorter’s directory of English paper mills up to 1800. These books, some in multiple copies, will be available for hands-on inspection. The session will conclude with a watermark identification exercise, an opportunity to test the operating principles of watermark dictionaries by using them to identify paper samples in the Rare Book School collection.

      Workshop sponsored by the Bibliographical Society of the University of Virginia.


      12. Editing Among the Disciplines

      Saturday, 14 October, 1:45–3:15 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: David L. Vander Meulen (University of Virginia)

      This workshop will serve as an introduction to the principles and practice of scholarly editing. The emphasis will be on the methodology of preparing an edition, either documentary or critical, and on the thinking that informs the decisions editors need to make about the issues they confront. In pondering how to create new editions, we will take into account principles of textual criticism, that is, the study of the history of texts and the evaluation of their changes.

      We will consider literary and non-literary texts, of different genres and eras; published and unpublished materials; and manuscript, printed, and electronic sources. The workshop should prove of interest for anyone preparing an edition (the lot of most academics at some point in their careers), for teachers choosing editions for the classroom, and for anyone wishing to understand the nature and reliability of the texts they use. It will also help those who wish to understand the terminology and concepts of textual scholarship. Additionally, it will benefit academics who think about what happens to texts made up of words or other visual symbols, in fields as diverse as law, religion, literature, and music. Finally, it will aid librarians and booksellers, who superintend and make available the documents by which the texts of works are transmitted.


      13. Strategies of Integration: Text and Image in Wood, Metal, and Stone (II)

      Saturday, 14 October, 8:30–10:00 a.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: Roger Gaskell (Roger Gaskell Rare Books)

      The relationship between text and image is an aspect of book design of huge significance in almost all kinds of books. Whether we are concerned with devotional texts, emblems and alchemy, science, medicine, natural history, travel, imaginative, or technical literature, the ways that text and image work together to make meaning is dependent on the technical possibilities of printing from wood, metal, and stone.

      Considering the choices made by authors/publishers/printers in putting books together, the ways that the worked with, or against the available technologies, we can learn how the relationship between text and image was understood in the time that the books were produced. Bookmakers went to considerable trouble and expense to bring text and image together in various ways, yet we rarely now read them together as a single entity.
      Participants will look at a range of books from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries alongside examples of woodblocks, copperplates, and lithographic stones. We will ask not only how the books were made, but why in each context the particular methods of printing and integration were chosen and what this tells us about the intentions of the bookmakers and their anticipated audience.


      14. Identification and Description of Paper (II)

      Saturday, 14 October, 10:45 a.m.–12:15 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: John Bidwell (The Morgan Library & Museum)

      This workshop will present a summary overview of techniques bibliographers have used to describe paper in the handpress period. Participants will learn some of the traditional terms indicating size, quality, handling properties, and surface characteristics. They will examine complete sheets of early paper to see how those terms can be applied. The specimen sheets will be mainly writing, drawing, and ledger papers made in England and France between the seventeenth and nineteen centuries.

      There will be a short discussion of different methods of recording watermarks for the purpose of dating, localizing, and authenticating books and manuscripts. Significant developments in this field will be noted with case studies such as Allan Stevenson’s The Problem of the Missale Speciale. Participants will compare different types of watermark dictionaries, including standard reference works by Briquet and Heawood and national histories with watermark supplements, such as Henk Voorn’s history of papermaking in Holland and Alfred Shorter’s directory of English paper mills up to 1800. These books, some in multiple copies, will be available for hands-on inspection. The session will conclude with a watermark identification exercise, an opportunity to test the operating principles of watermark dictionaries by using them to identify paper samples in the Rare Book School collection.


      15. The Business of Publishing: Reading Financial Records as a Source for the History of the Book (II)

      Friday, 13 October, 3:45–5:15 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Instructor: Michael Winship (The University of Texas at Austin)

      This workshop will introduce participants to the use and interpretation of publishers’ and book trade archives and other records as a source for the study of the creation, production, distribution, and reception of books and other printed materials. Although the focus will be on American publishing from the colonial period to the twentieth century, British practice may also be addressed if students desire. The workshop is chiefly aimed at scholars who are engaged in book historical research, but will also be of use to librarians, collectors, and others whose interests or responsibilities would benefit from an understanding and knowledge of the archives and records that document the history of American and British book production and publishing.

  • Pop-Up Sessions

    • 1. Critical Bibliography and Social Justice (Roundtable)

      Thursday, 12 October, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

      Benjamin Franklin Hall, American Philosophical Society

      Organizer & Moderator: Caroline Wigginton (University of Mississippi)

      Melissa Adler (Western University)
      Rhae Lynn Barnes (University of Southern California; Princeton University)
      Alex Galarza (Haverford College)
      Chris Hunter (California Institute of Technology)
      Dorothy Kim (Vassar College)
      Clare Mullaney (University of Pennsylvania)
      Priyasha Mukhopadhyay (Harvard University)

      This roundtable examines bibliography’s relationship to colonialism and imperialism and its obligation to social justice. How should bibliography among the disciplines be explicating and responding to the histories of inequality and violence that are inextricably a part of the shape and content of our museums, universities, and libraries—the institutions that we work for and rely on? How can and should an ethos of social justice structure our teaching, our research, and our public scholarship? Speakers will represent a range of disciplines and institutions. We hope that the discussion will prompt active participation from the audience. This event is open to all conference attendees and their guests.

      Workshop sponsored by the American Philosophical Society.

      2. Critical Bibliography and Social Justice: Research Strategies Exchange (Lunch)

      Friday, 13 October, 12:30–1:30 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Facilitator: Hwisang Cho (Xavier University)

      A lunch session for sharing critical bibliography research strategies and approaches that attend to questions of social justice. Attendees can come prepared to speak briefly about their own methods, can come with questions, or can come simply to listen. All researchers—including those from libraries, museums, and academic departments—are welcome. Click here by Wednesday, 4 October, to preorder a box lunch.

      Session sponsored by the Grolier Club.

      3. Critical Bibliography and Social Justice: Pedagogy Strategies Exchange (Lunch)

      Saturday, 14 October, 12:30–1:30 p.m.

      Chemical Heritage Foundation

      Facilitators: Rhae Lynn Barnes (University of Southern California; Princeton University) and Megan McNamee (Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts)

      A lunch session for sharing critical bibliography teaching strategies and approaches that attend to questions of social justice. Attendees can come prepared to speak briefly about their own methods, can come with questions, or can come simply to listen. Teachers and educators from all fields are welcome. Click here by Wednesday, 4 October, to preorder a box lunch.

      Session sponsored by the Grolier Club.

  • Session Moderators

    • Arthur Bahr (Associate Professor of Literature, Massachusetts Institute of Technology); Ann Blair (Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor of History and Director of Undergraduate Studies, Harvard University); Matt Cohen (Associate Professor of English, University of Nebraska-Lincoln); Lucia Dacome (Associate Professor, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, University of Toronto); Julie Nelson Davis (Professor of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania); Margaret J.M. Ezell (Distinguished Professor of English and John and Sara Lindsey Chair of Liberal Arts, Texas A&M University); Stephanie Ann Frampton (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); Alex Gil (Digital Scholarship Coordinator, Humanities and History Division, Columbia University Libraries); James Green (Librarian, the Library Company of Philadelphia); Rebecca Hankins (Associate Professor and Archivist/Librarian of Africana Studies and Women’s & Gender Studies, Texas A&M University); Isabel Hofmeyr (Professor of African Literature, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg; Global Distinguished Professor of English, New York University); Joseph Howley (Associate Professor of Classics, Columbia University); Vera Keller (University of Oregon); Matthew G. Kirschenbaum (Professor, Department of English, University of Maryland); Suzanne Karr Schmidt (George Amos Poole III Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts, The Newberry); Shelley Langdale (Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings, Philadelphia Museum of Art); Meredith L. McGill (Associate Professor of English, Rutgers University); Brinkley Messick (Professor, Department of Anthropology, Columbia University); Stephen Nichols (Professor Emeritus and Research Professor; James M. Beall Professor Emeritus of French and Humanities, Johns Hopkins University); Will Noel (Director of the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts and Director of the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies, University of Pennsylvania); Leah Price (Francis Lee Higginson Professor of English Literature, Harvard University); Katherine Reagan (Assistant Director for Collections & Ernest L. Stern Curator of Rare Books & Manuscripts, Cornell University); Catharine Dann Roeber (Assistant Professor of Decorative Arts and Material Culture at the Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library); Yael Rice (Amherst College); Michael Sappol (Independent scholar, Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study); Kathryn Rudy (Director of Research, School of Art History, University of St. Andrews); Michael F. Suarez, S.J. (Director of Rare Book School; Professor of English, University Professor, and Honorary Curator of Special Collections at the University of Virginia); Kate van Orden (Dwight P. Robinson Jr. Professor of Music, Harvard University); David Whitesell (Curator, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia); Heather Wolfe (Curator of Manuscripts, Folger Shakespeare Library)

  • Conference Planning Committee

    • Conference Co-chairs

      Barbara Heritage & Donna Sy

      Conference Coordinator

      Claire Reeger

      CFP Review

      Courtney Roby • Chair
      Barbara Heritage & Donna Sy • Ex Officio
      Meghan Doherty
      András Kiséry
      Aaron Pratt
      Lena Salaymeh
      Caroline Wigginton

      Plenary Organization

      Plenary 1: Vera Keller & Yael Rice

      Plenary 2: Stephanie Ann Frampton

      Plenary 3: András Kiséry & Marissa Nicosia

      Local Arrangements

      Marissa Nicosia
      Juliet Sperling • Restaurant Guide & Photography

      PR

      András Kiséry
      Marissa Nicosia
      Aaron Pratt