Events & Activities

Upcoming Events & Activities

  • Oct 12
    /
    Oct 15
    2017
    Bibliography Among the Disciplines Conference

    Presented by: Rare Book School and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
    Philadelphia, PA

    Bibliography Among the Disciplines, a four-day international conference to be held in Philadelphia from 12 to 15 October 2017, will bring together scholarly professionals who are poised to address current problems pertaining to the study of textual artifacts that cross scholarly, pedagogical, professional, and curatorial domains. The conference will explore theories and methods common to the object-oriented disciplines, such as anthropology and archaeology, but new to bibliography. The Bibliography Among the Disciplines program, supported by Rare Book School and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, aims to promote focused cross-disciplinary exchange and future scholarly collaborations.

    See the conference website for schedule information and additional details. […]

  • May 4
    /
    May 5
    2017
    Paper Technologies: The Materiality of Empire & State Formation in Latin America (RBS-Mellon Conference)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the Wesleyan University Department of History, the Wesleyan University Center for the Americas, the Wesleyan University Program in Latin American Studies, the Beinecke Library, and the Yale University Council on Latin American and Iberian Studies
    Wesleyan University and Yale University

    This two-day conference at Wesleyan and Yale Universities examines the material dimensions of empire and state formation in Latin America. It works to understand the political, legal, and cultural processes of empire and state formation in relation to concrete quotidian practices of inscription. Through the creation of artifacts such as printed books, manuscripts, passports, and other kinds of technologies, Iberian empires and post-colonial states took on tangible forms as they worked to regulate social relations on the ground. At the same time, subjects actively shaped empire and state making by engaging with paper in pursuit of their own hopes and dreams. […]

  • Apr
    28
    2017
    Buddhist Book Cultures Symposium (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the University of Denver Department of Religious Studies, and the Marsico Visiting Scholars Program
    Sturm 286, University of Denver

    Please join the University of Denver Department of Religious Studies on Friday, 28 April for our Buddhist Book Cultures Symposium from 1:30 to 5:00 p.m. in Sturm 286.

    1:30–3:30 Panel 1: Buddhist Manuscript Cultures Across Asia, 9th–13th Centuries

    • Jinah Kim, Harvard University – Books on Pedestals: Buddhist Manuscripts & Their Function & Use in Medieval South Asia
    • Rae Erin Dachille, University of Arizona – Text as Image: Art History, Paleography, & the Material World of a Dunhuang Manuscript
    • Bryan Lowe, Vanderbilt University – Inscribing Orality: Performance & Production of a Homiletic Manuscript from 9th-Century Japan

    3:15–4:45 Panel 2: Woodblocks, […]

Past Events & Activities

  • Apr
    21
    2017
    Object Lessons: Manuscript and the Print Devolution (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the University of Texas at Austin Department of English
    Sinclair Suite, Texas Union 3.128, University of Texas at Austin

    An oft-repeated narrative of epochal change posits that the invention of moveable type by Johannes Gutenberg in the mid-fifteenth century was one that fundamentally—and immediately—propelled the medieval world into modernity. Scholarship on fifteenth-century manuscript production and the economies of the late-medieval book trade, however, reveals a complex and vibrant manuscript culture—networks of scribes, illuminators, and workshops, booksellers and readers—that did not simply cease to exist after the advent of print. The arrival of William Caxton’s press to England in 1476 would have introduced scales of production previously unknown in the country, but continuities in the format, decoration, and materials associated with book manufacture suggest that the production of handwritten documents need not have diminished. […]

  • Apr
    21
    2017
    Eccentric Readings in East Asia (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Institute for Advanced Studies
    West Lecture Hall, Institute for Advanced Studies, Princeton University

    Why did some people produce idiosyncratic texts that defied the norms of reading and writing of their period? How did these practices change social actors’ relationship to political or religious authorities? What information can we obtain from the nontextual elements of documents, and in what ways does this kind of information help us better understand the meanings of texts?

    By exploring the important and rich textual tradition of East Asia, this half-day symposium hopes to expand our understanding of the relationship between written culture and sociocultural power. By focusing on material and nontextual aspects of premodern East Asian texts, […]

  • Apr 20
    /
    Apr 22
    2017
    Protestantism and the Materiality of Texts (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; Duke Graduate Program in Religion; Barney Jones Endowment of the Duke Department of Religious Studies; Princeton Graduate School; Princeton Center for the Study of Religion
    Princeton University

    From the days of the early reformers through the twenty-first century, Protestants have made voracious use of printed books and other media to spread a religion of the Word. For its vaunted emphasis on texts, Protestantism remains associated with words, thought, and private reading, as opposed to things, practices, and communal devotion. However, as scholars across the disciplines have demonstrated, texts are never only containers for words. Whether handwritten, printed, or typed on a screen, words and their meanings are entwined with material forms and embodied practices at every stage of their production, circulation, and reception.

    The material bases of both Protestantism and textual media have been key sites of inquiry in the larger material turn in the humanities. […]

  • Apr
    20
    2017
    The Medieval Bible in the Polarized World of American Religion (RBS-Mellon Lecture)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Duke University Divinity School
    0014 Westbrook Building, Duke Divinity School

    The Duke Divinity School and the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School sponsor a public lecture, “The Medieval Bible in the Polarized World of American Religion,” by Frans van Liere, Professor of History and Director of the Medieval Studies Program at Calvin College.

    See the event website for additional details. […]

  • Apr 20
    /
    Apr 22
    2017
    Triangle Book History Symposium (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the National Humanities Center
    National Humanities Center (et al.)

    Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the National Humanities Center, the first Triangle Book History Symposium will take place on 20–22 April 2017 in the Research Triangle of North Carolina. The symposium brings together a diverse community of scholars and practitioners to share perspectives on the history of the book, broadly conceived. Through shared discussion and site visits to some of the unique collections and studios in the Triangle, the symposium aims to broaden the disciplinary interests of book history and to facilitate new collaborations among its participants, including from the National Humanities Center, […]

  • Apr
    12
    2017
    Strange Alliances: Demons, Exorcists, and the Fight against Unbelief in Eighteenth-Century Italy (RBS-Mellon Lecture & Roundtable)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; Bancroft Library; U.C. Berkeley Department of Italian Studies; U.C. Berkeley Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies
    370 Dwinelle Hall, U.C. Berkeley

    Federico Barbierato of the University of Verona will deliver a lecture, “Strange Alliances: Demons, Exorcists, and the Fight against Unbelief in Eighteenth-Century Italy.”

    Join us for Dr. Barbierato’s lecture, followed by a round table discussion with U.C. Berkeley faculty:

    Thomas Dandelet, History
    Diego Pirillo, Italian Studies
    Jonathan Sheehan, History

    See the event webpage for additional information. […]

  • Apr
    6
    2017
    Europe: A Literary History, 1559–1648 (RBS-Mellon Lecture & Roundtable)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; Bancroft Library; U.C. Berkeley Departments of Italian Studies, English, Romance Languages and Literatures, and Spanish & Portuguese; U.C. Berkeley Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies
    370 Dwinelle Hall, U.C. Berkeley

    Warren Boutcher, Professor of Renaissance Studies at Queen Mary University of London, will deliver a lecture, “Europe: A Literary History (1559–1648).”

    Join us for Dr. Boutcher’s lecture, followed by a round table discussion with U.C. Berkeley faculty:

    Ivonne de Valle, Spanish & Portuguese
    Timothy Hampton, French and Comparative Literature
    Victoria Kahn, English and Comparative Literature
    Ignacio Navarrete, Spanish & Portuguese
    Diego Pirillo, Italian Studies

    See the event webpage for additional details. […]

  • Apr 6
    /
    Apr 7
    2017
    Bible Craft: Making and Remaking Scripture in Early Britain and America (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; the University of Arkansas Department of English; the J. William Fulbright College of Arts & Sciences; the University of Arkansas Honors College; the University of Arkansas' Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program and the Indigenous Studies Program
    University of Arkansas

    Featuring a keynote lecture on Thursday, 6 April at 5:15 p.m. by Frans van Liere of Calvin College, “The Bible as Book – The Bible as Text.”

    A symposium will follow on Friday, 7 April.

    See the event webpage for full schedule and additional information. […]

  • Mar 31
    /
    Apr 1
    2017
    Objects of Study: Paper, Ink, and the Material Turn (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts; Provost's Interdisciplinary Arts Grant, University of Pennsylvania; McNeil Center for Early American Studies; Penn Program in Comparative Literature & Literary Theory; Penn Visual Studies Program; Penn Humanities Forum; Department of the History of Art, U.C. Berkeley
    Widener Lecture Hall, Penn Museum (Friday); Kislak Center for Special Collections Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, University of Pennsylvania (Saturday)

    The goal of this symposium is to dissect the interpretive aims of “materiality studies” through a focused lens of works on paper. In recent years, “materiality” has become a buzzword across the humanities, and an impressive range of methods, investigative starting points, and analytic goals have come to rest under the term’s mantle. But in grouping this diverse array of approaches under a single heading, does each method’s unique potential risk becoming flattened and obscured? An illustrated book might just as easily inspire a reconsideration of workshop practices as it could a chemical investigation of ink formulae; are social history and chemistry, […]

  • Mar
    30
    2017
    The Never-ending Popularity of Njáls Saga: The Manuscript Evidence (RBS-Mellon Lecture)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, University of Maine Humanities Center
    Little Hall, Room 130, University of Maine

    Campus lecture by Svanhildur Óskarsdóttir (Research Associate Professor, Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, University of Iceland), an expert on the study of medieval manuscripts from the University of Iceland, who will speak on “The Never-ending Popularity of Njáls Saga: The Manuscript Evidence” as part of the University of Maine Humanities Center’s 2016–17 symposium Saga and Story: An Interdisciplinary Exploration from the Vikings to Our Time.

    See the event website for more information. […]

  • Mar
    24
    2017
    (Dis)entangling Global Early Modernities, 1300–1800 (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, Harvard Asia Center, Harvard Colloquium for Intellectual History, Harvard Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard Center for African Studies, Harvard History Department, Harvard Early Modern History Workshop, Harvard Medieval Studies Committee, Harvard Center for History and Economics, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs
    Tsai Auditorium, CGIS South, Harvard University

    This conference proposes a new concept—“(dis)entanglement”—in order to provide alternative narratives of the early modern world, 1300–1800. Recent scholarship has emphasized the integrative nature of economic, material, and religious developments. In contrast, we will examine what the “global” could mean in intellectual and cultural interactions in terms of both integration and disintegration across multiple continents and oceans. Our conference participants will explore how the notion of “(dis)entanglement” allows us to evoke a polycentric early modern world that is simultaneously connecting and disconnecting.

    See the event website for full schedule and additional details. […]

  • Mar
    23
    2017
    Shaping Eyre: A Conversation about (Re)reading Brontë in the 21st Century

    Presented by: Virginia Festival of the Book, Rare Book School & UVA Libraries
    Dome Room, UVA Rotunda

    Why are modern day readers still responsive to Jane Eyre, and how do their readings influence the life of the text? Linden Kent Memorial Professor Karen Chase (Brontë scholar and author of Eros & Psyche) leads a discussion with author Patricia Park (Re Jane) and rare book curator Barbara Heritage (“Shaping Eyre”) about the enduring influence of Charlotte Brontë’s nineteenth-century novel, Jane Eyre. The discussion, to be held in the Dome Room of UVA’s renovated Rotunda (4:00–5:00 p.m.) will be followed by a book signing and an opportunity to explore the rare artifacts in the accompanying RBS exhibition, […]

  • Mar
    4
    2017
    Canons & Contingence: Art Histories of the Book in England and America (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; UMass Amherst Graduate School; UMass Amherst History of Art and Architecture Department; UMass Amherst College of Humanities and Fine Arts, Faculty Support Conference Grant; Mount Holyoke College Art History Department; Smith College, Office of the Provost and the Art Department; Amherst College Archives & Special Collections; Five College Lecture Fund
    Integrative Learning Center, Room S240, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    Recent scholarship in bibliography and the history of the book has attended to the ways in which bibliographic media resist, defy, and elude uniformity, even under the greatest technological pressures to conform. Whether through variables in the production process or through the vagaries of transmission and consumption, each manuscript or printed book carries with it the traces of a unique history.

  • Mar 2
    /
    Mar 3
    2017
    Cartographic Materialities: Mapping the Pre-Modern World (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; and at the University of California, Berkeley: Designated Emphasis in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies; The Townsend Center for the Humanities; the Department of Spanish and Portuguese; the History of the Book Working Group; the Mobilities and Materialities Working Group; the Department of French; the Department of English; the James D. Hart Chair; the Ida Mae and William J. Eggers, Jr. Chair; and the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies
    University of California, Berkeley

    Thursday, 2 March
    3:30–5 p.m.
    Cartographic Objects Workshop at the Bancroft Library (David Faulds)
    Please RSVP to jraisch@berkeley.edu

    Friday, 3 March
    1:15–2:45 p.m. – Graduate Student Panel, 308A Doe Library

    Keith Budner (Comparative Literature) – “From Geography to Chorography: Representing Pomponius Mela, Ptolemy and Strabo in Two Spanish Renaissance Maps”

    Jason Rozumalski (History) – “Kaleidoscopes of Time and Place: Images of places as events in sixteenth-century England”

    Grace Harpster (Art History) – “Pastoral Maps: Devotional and Administrative Itineraries in Rural Sixteenth-Century Milan”

    Moderator: Diego Pirillo (Italian)

    3:00–5:00 p.m.  […]

  • Feb
    9
    2017
    RBS-UVA Fellowship Information Reception

    Presented by: Rare Book School
    118 Alderman Library

    University of Virginia undergraduate and graduate students are invited to attend an informal information reception about the RBS-UVA Fellowship program. Light refreshments will be served. […]

  • Feb
    8
    2017
    RBS-UVA Fellowship Information Reception

    Presented by: Rare Book School
    118 Alderman Library

    University of Virginia undergraduate and graduate students are invited to attend an informal information reception about the RBS-UVA Fellowship program. Light refreshments will be served. […]

  • Jan
    30
    2017
    Paper in Asia (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Art History Department, Dartmouth College Library, and Leslie Center for the Humanities at Dartmouth College
    Current Periodicals Room, Baker-Berry Library, Dartmouth College

    In association with the exhibition “Paper: A Material of Empire and Revolution in South Asia” on view in Dartmouth’s Baker-Berry Library through January 2017, we have invited scholars who touch on how paper as a material intertwines with the information that it carries.

  • Nov
    22
    2016
    RBS-UVA Fellowship Information Reception

    Presented by: Rare Book School
    118 Alderman Library

    University of Virginia undergraduate and graduate students are invited to attend an informal information reception about the RBS-UVA Fellowship program. Light refreshments will be served. […]

  • Nov
    2
    2016
    Material Knowledge: Science and the Hand Press (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Georgia State University Department of History
    Troy Moore Library, Room 2343, Georgia State University

    Material Knowledge: Science and the Hand Press

    Wednesday 2 November 2016

    Troy Moore Library, Room 2343, 25 Park Place NE, Atlanta, GA 30303

    Schedule:

    9:00 a.m. Welcome

    9:30–11:00 a.m.

    Hanna Marcus, Harvard University, “Expurgated Medical Books: The Materiality of Prohibited Knowledge”

    Daniel Margocsy, Cambridge University, “Vesalius in America: Collecting De humani corporis fabrica in the modern age”

    11:00–11:30 a.m. Coffee Break

    11:30 a.m.–1 p.m.

    Robert Batchelor, Georgia Southern University “Games in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Popular Numeracy and Printed Ephemera in Early Modern East Asia and Europe”

    Richard Keatley, […]

  • Oct 28
    /
    Oct 30
    2016
    RBS at the Boston Book Fair

    Presented by: RBS
    Hynes Convention Center, Boston, MA

    If you’ll be in Boston for the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair (28–30 October), please be sure to stop by the Rare Book School table on Cultural Row. We’ll be at Booth 628 (floor plan), with printed copies of our spring/summer 2017 schedule, a slideshow of images from 2016 RBS classes, and more.

    Rare Book School Director Michael F. Suarez, S.J., Associate Director & Curator of Collections Barbara Heritage, Assistant Curator of Collections Ruth-Ellen St. Onge, Development Director Megan Gildea, and Director of Communications & Outreach Jeremy Dibbell will all be at the Fair, […]

  • Oct
    27
    2016
    ABAA-RBS Seminar Series

    Presented by: The Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA) and Rare Book School
    North Bennet Street School, Boston MA

    Rare Book School and the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) are co-sponsoring a one-day seminar series at the North Bennet Street School in Boston, MA (map) on Thursday, 27 October 2016 (just prior to the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair). These seminars have been designed to be of interest to book collectors and booksellers, but signup is open to anyone with an interest in the topics covered. The cost to attend the seminar series is $500.

    As space is limited, signup for the seminar series will be handled on a first-come, […]

  • Oct
    17
    2016
    Medieval Books (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, IPFW Program in Medieval Studies, Department of English and Linguistics, Department of History, Chapman Distinguished Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
    Liberal Arts Building, Room 35A, Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne

    Professor Carissa Harris of Temple University presents “Obscenity, Censorship, and Creativity in Fifteenth-Century Manuscripts” on Monday, 17 October at noon.

    See the event website for additional details.

    Sponsored by The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, IPFW Program in Medieval Studies, Department of English and Linguistics, Department of History, Chapman Distinguished Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs […]

  • Sep
    30
    2016
    Shakespeare, The Book (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and Trinity University
    Special Collections, Coates Library, Trinity University

    As the apposition in the title hopefully hints, this symposium is committed to the central claim that Shakespeare, as we identify and teach him today, has been fundamentally shaped by the book trade and its customers. Print publishers and retail booksellers have marketed and sold Shakespeare’s writing, printers have undertaken the physical and intellectual labor of transforming manuscripts into print forms that are recognizable as books, and readers have been left after all of this to buy, engage with, and preserve—or ignore and discard—the editions that have been made available to them. Individuals connected to the early theater industry in London appear to have supplied manuscripts to begin this process, […]

  • Sep 30
    /
    Oct 1
    2016
    The Materiality of Scientific Knowledge: Image-Text-Book (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania; University of Pennsylvania Humanities Forum; Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation
    Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, Kislak Center, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, University of Pennsylvania

    This two day symposium will explore the material factors—specifically, the conditions of writing, printing, and illustration—that underwrite the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. Throughout the long history of scientific investigation, concepts and theories were formulated, shared, legitimated, and disseminated in manuscript and printed texts, as well as paintings, drawings, and engravings. Most scholarship in this area has focused on either the text or the images in scientific manuscripts and printed books, or has explored the relationship between text and image from the perspective of a single field or historical period. This symposium will bring scholars from a wide range of academic disciplines (history of science, […]

  • Sep 23
    /
    Sep 24
    2016
    States of the Book (RBS-Mellon Conference)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the West Point Association of Graduates
    United States Military Academy at West Point

    A conference considering the relation of the material text to the formation and function of states and state-like structures. An investigation of the methods and effects of state and institutional manipulation of textual materialities to create, control, or shape responses from the oral ancient to contemporary digital.

    Rare Book School Director Michael F. Suarez, S.J. will deliver the keynote address.

    See the event registration page for details about attending this conference, or for the full schedule. […]

  • Sep
    15
    2016
    RBS Open House

    Presented by: Rare Book School
    118 Alderman Library

    All are welcome at Rare Book School’s fall open house, scheduled for Thursday, 15 September 2016 as part of the Human/Ties program at UVA to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    • Learn about Rare Book School’s courses and programs, including fellowship opportunities for UVA undergraduate and graduate students
    • Find out how you can use your faculty/staff UVA education benefit to cover RBS course tuition
    • Print a letterpress keepsake
    • View a selection of materials from our world-class teaching collection
    • Enjoy coffee, donuts, and conversation with the RBS staff

    We hope to see you there! […]

  • Sep
    10
    2016
    Graphic Design in the Digital Future Lessons from the Renaissance Book (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, Book Studies at Wellsley, the Program in Medieval-Renaissance Studies, and the Departments of English and History at Wellesley College
    Margaret Clapp Library Lecture Room, Wellesley College

    Our media landscape is changing radically. New technologies offer new ways of reading and new modes of presenting texts—but how completely can we really break with old paradigms? Do the design principles of the printed book have a place in our digital future? To find an answer, this conference compares our ongoing technological revolution with an earlier one: the invention of the printed book itself in Renaissance Europe. Lectures, workshops, and discussion by historians and practitioners of printing, web design, and typography will enable the audience to apply lessons from the Renaissance to the design challenges of the present.

    Speakers and workshop leaders include Simran Thadani, […]

  • Jun
    16
    2016
    MATERIA: New Approaches to Material Text in the Roman World (RBS-Mellon Workshop)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and Columbia University’s Lenfest Junior Faculty Development Fund
    Butler Library Room 523, Columbia University

    MATERIA: New Approaches to Material Text in the Roman World is a day-long workshop presenting new research in the area of the ancient book in the Roman World, broadly conceived. This event brings together six speakers from across the country who work on different aspects of the intersection of classical text and material culture to present work in progress. Each speaker will have a significant block of time to present his/her findings, with ample time for questions and feedback from the audience and fellow panelists. Audience members are encouraged to come for the day, throughout which refreshments will be provided. […]

  • May
    5
    2016
    A Phenomenology of the Reading Room: Data, Post-Criticism, and the British American Print Shop (RBS-Mellon Lecture)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the University of Mississippi Department of English
    Bondurant 204C, University of Mississippi at Oxford

    At 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, 5 May 2016, Matthew P. Brown, Associate Professor in the Center for the Book and the English Department at the University of Iowa, will deliver the keynote lecture for the “Early American Materialities” symposium: “A Phenomenology of the Reading Room: Data, Post-Criticism, and the British American Print Shop.”

  • Apr
    8
    2016
    Mellon Symposium on Manuscripts and Rare Books (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, University of Arkansas Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, Department of English, University of Arkansas Honors College
    Gearhart Hall, Honors Study Hall, University of Arkansas

    Event schedule:

    9:40–10:30 a.m. Damian J. Fleming: “Looking for Hebrew in all the Wrong Places.”

    10:45–11:35 a.m. Carrisa Harris: “Obscenity, Censorship, and Creativity in Fifteenth-Century English Manuscripts.”

    11:50 a.m–12:40 p.m. Joseph A. Howley: “Long Table’s Journey into Nights: How Ancient Books, Medieval Manuscripts, and Early Printing Invented the Table of Contents.”

    2:00–2:50 p.m. Virginia Blanton & Nathan Oyler: “Unlocking the Mysteries of a Medieval Chant Book with Multispectral Imaging.”

    3:05–4:20 p.m. David F. Johnson: “Visualizing the Paleography of Punctuation: Forensic Philology and the Interventions of the Tremulous Hand of Worcester.” […]

  • Apr 3
    /
    Apr 4
    2016
    The Lives of Religious Books (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, Duke University Interdisciplinary Studies, and the Duke University Center for Jewish Studies
    Holsti-Anderson Room, Rubenstein Library, Duke University

    Duke Divinity School Professor Jennie Grillo has organized a symposium featuring David Stern of Harvard University and Dagmar Riedel of Columbia University as well as a number of local scholars presenting their research on histories of religious books in various traditions.

    Stern is the Harry Starr Professor of Classical and Modern Jewish and Hebrew Literature and professor of comparative literature at Harvard, and Riedel is an associate research scholar at Columbia.

    Grillo, assistant professor of Old Testament, organized the event as part of a Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School. It was also co-sponsored by an Intellectual Community Planning Grant from Duke University awarded to Grillo, […]

  • Apr
    1
    2016
    Varieties of Textual Experience: A Symposium on the Material Text Across the Disciplines (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities, and the Colby College English Department
    Miller Library, Colby College

    This one-day symposium will bring together scholars from across the humanities to discuss the role of the material text in their research and scholarly practice. The bibliographic scholar D.F. McKenzie famously asserted that the form of a text inevitably shapes its meaning; from contemporary internet cultures to medieval manuscripts, how do we account for this in the specific archives, media, and disciplinary contexts in which we conduct our work?

    This event has been generously supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the Colby Center for the Arts and Humanities, and the Colby English Department. […]

  • Mar 30
    /
    Mar 31
    2016
    Medieval Books: A Symposium (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Program in Medieval Studies, Department of English and Linguistics, Department of History, Chapman Distinguished Professor of English, College of Arts and Sciences, Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
    Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne

    The keynote address, “Why Books Matter,” will be delivered by Elaine Treharne, Roberta Bowman Denning Professor of Humanities and Professor of English at Stanford University. Thursday, 31 March at 5 p.m., Neff Hall, Room 101 (Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne).

    Additional panel sessions will be held on Wednesday, 30 March and Thursday, 31 March. See the event website for full details. All events are free and open to the public.

    Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Program in Medieval Studies, […]

  • Mar
    16
    2016
    Writing the Nation: Correspondence and Collaboration in Early Modern British Science (RBS-Mellon Lecture)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, Oregon Rare Books Initiative, Robert D. Clark Honors College, University of Oregon College of Arts and Sciences, Department of English, Oregon Humanities Center, and University of Oregon Libraries Special Collections and University Archives
    Paulson Reading Room, Knight Library, University of Oregon

    Oregon Rare Books Initiative presents Elizabeth Yale (Center for the Book, University of Iowa):

    From the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence to this year’s vote on Britain’s exit from the European Union (“Brexit,” in the press), the question of what Britain is—and will be—has been in the news. This talk explores that question from the perspective of the seventeenth century sciences of the land—natural history and antiquarian studies, which, in tracing the human and natural history of Britain, sought to hold up a mirror that showed Britons themselves. Linking themselves together through correspondence and travel, naturalists in England, […]

  • Feb
    4
    2016
    RBS-UVA Fellowship Information Reception

    Presented by: Rare Book School
    118 Alderman Library

    University of Virginia undergraduate and graduate students are invited to attend an informal information reception about the RBS-UVA Fellowship program. Light refreshments will be served. […]

  • Feb
    3
    2016
    RBS-UVA Fellowship Information Reception

    Presented by: Rare Book School
    118 Alderman Library

    University of Virginia undergraduate and graduate students are invited to attend an informal information reception about the RBS-UVA Fellowship program. Light refreshments will be served. […]

  • Dec 2
    /
    Dec 3
    2015
    Of Books & Men: Archives, Artifacts, and Inquiry (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the Berea College Art and Art History Program, the Berea College English Program, Hutchins Library, and the Berea College Dean’s Office
    Berea College

    This symposium will bring three scholars to the Berea College campus. Each of their work intersects with history of the book and humanistic inquiry in different ways. The symposium has been supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the Art and Art History Program, the English Program, Hutchins Library, and the Dean’s Office.

    The symposium is structured around presentations by visiting scholars in classes and presentations by students in ARH 286 on books from the Curio Collection. The schedule is below.

    Wednesday, December 2

    12:40–2:30 p.m.—Scott Manning Stevens (Syracuse) Presentation to Combined ENG 310 Renegades and Romance & […]

  • Nov
    19
    2015
    RBS Open House

    Presented by: Rare Book School
    118 Alderman Library

    You are cordially invited to join the RBS staff for our fall open house to:

    • Learn about Rare Book School’s courses and programs, including fellowship opportunities for UVA undergraduate and graduate students
    • Find out how you can use your faculty/staff UVA education benefit to cover RBS course tuition
    • Pick up a copy of the 2016 summer course schedule
    • Print a letterpress keepsake
    • View a selection of materials from our world-class teaching collection
    • Enjoy light snacks and refreshments

    We hope to see you there! […]

  • Nov
    11
    2015
    ABAA-RBS Seminar Series

    Presented by: The Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA) and Rare Book School
    North Bennet Street School, Boston MA

    Rare Book School and the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) are co-sponsoring a joint one-day seminar series at the North Bennet Street School in Boston, MA on Wednesday, 11 November 2015 (just prior to the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair). These seminars have been designed to be of interest to book collectors and booksellers, but signup is open to anyone with an interest in the topics covered.

  • Oct
    17
    2015
    Material Methodologies in Latin American & Iberian Studies (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School
    Columbia University

    This conference will bring together a group of advanced graduate students to share their doctoral research and the diverse ways in which they take materiality into account in their studies of Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula across disciplines.

  • Oct 16
    /
    Oct 17
    2015
    Scientific Books and their Makers (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the University of Iowa Center for the Book, the University of Iowa Obermann Center for Advanced Studies and the Departments of History and English
    University of Iowa

    In the preface to Micrographia (1665), one of the first visual studies of the microscopic world, the experimental philosopher Robert Hooke argued that knowledge of nature was rooted in human vision, especially as augmented by tools like the recently-invented microscope, and human craft, which built the microscope and made images of the new worlds that it revealed. Hooke suggested that without such instruments, humans were ill-equipped to apprehend the true nature of reality, hidden just beyond the edge of sight. The microscope challenged the primacy of human vision—augmenting it, but also threatening to override it.

    In early modern Europe, […]

  • Sep
    25
    2015
    Agents of Contact: Books and Print between Cultures in the Early Modern Period (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the Simon H. Rifkind Center for the Humanities and Arts at CCNY, the Division of Humanities and Arts of CCNY, and the CCNY English Department.
    City College of New York

    This one-day symposium will present research on the impact of books and print on intellectual contact (broadly construed) within Europe as well as between European and non-European cultures.

    The symposium is intended to encourage cross-disciplinary conversation, and is therefore defined by a conceptual framework rather than a strict thematic focus. Its title is anhommage to Elizabeth Eisenstein’s seminal book, The Printing Press as an Agent of Change, which helped to establish the study of print culture as an area of study in its own right, one that has contributed to – and helped to transform – research in intellectual history, […]

  • Sep 18
    /
    Sep 19
    2015
    Books and Print between Cultures, 1500–1900 (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; the Dean of Faculty, the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations (the Tagliabue and Hall Funds), the Department of Art and the History of Art, and the Program in European Studies at Amherst College; and the Book Studies Concentration at Smith College.
    Amherst College

    Books and Print between Cultures investigates the role that books (printed books and manuscripts, including maps, scrolls, etc.), prints, and their associated technologies played in mediating and instantiating cultural difference in the early modern period. It approaches these materials as intermediary (“between”), but also as “flows,” a term borrowed from social-cultural anthropologist Arjun Appadurai, to underscore the fluid and yet chaotic manner in which books and prints proliferated and were circulated, reconfigured, and reconstituted around the globe. Rather than considering books and prints through a strictly semiotic or iconographic lens—i.e., as assemblages of signs and symbols, texts and images—this symposium foregrounds the materiality of these objects qua objects. […]

  • Aug
    27
    2015
    How Materiality Shapes the Law: from Manuscripts to Digitization (RBS-Mellon Program)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School
    Boalt Hall, Berkeley School of Law

    Public Reception: 4:00–4:30 p.m. 295 Boalt Hall (Warren Room)

    Public Panel Event: 4:30–6:00 p.m. Boalt Hall 170 (Koret Room)

    Gero Dolezalek (Aberdeen) “Why Did Early Modern Scots Hand-Write Legal Literature Instead of Printing It?”

    Paul Halliday (University of Virginia) “Precedents Are Things: Clerical Authority and the Judge’s Voice in the Eighteenth Century”

    Robert Berring, Jr. (Boalt) “Rethinking Legal Authority in the Digital Age”

    (Gero Dolezalek will teach a legal paleography workshop on 28 August 2015).

    Contact: RBS-Mellon Fellow and Robbins Collection Associate Research Fellow, Lena Salaymeh (lenas@berkeley.edu)

    Please RSVP if you plan to attend. […]

  • Jun
    2
    2015
    Archival Afterlives: Life, Death, and Knowledge-Making in Early Modern British Scientific and Medical Archives (RBS-Mellon Conference)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, Brill Academic Publishing, the British Society for the History of Science, the University of Iowa, the University of Lincoln, the University of Oregon, and the Royal Society.
    The Royal Society, London

    This international conference explores the posthumous fortunes of scientific and medical archives in early modern Britain. If early modern natural philosophers claimed all knowledge as their province, theirs was a paper empire. This conference analyses how did these (often) disorderly collections of paper come to be ‘the archives of the Scientific Revolution’. To what extent did the histories unearthed serve as an index of the cultural position of scientific activity since the early modern period? Exploring the posthumous scientific and medical archive also lets us consider the genealogies of scientific influence, and the creation and management of scientific genius as a posthumous project. […]

  • Apr
    24
    2015
    After Print: Manuscripts in the Eighteenth Century (RBS-Mellon Conference)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the UCSB Early Modern Center
    McCune Conference Room, 6220 HSSB, University of California, Santa Barbara

    This conference will bring together junior and senior scholars to explore the continued vitality of manuscript publication and circulation in the eighteenth century. Scholars now often take for granted that the eighteenth century constituted an established “print culture,” whether that culture was inherent in the technology or forged by its users. By the age of Addison and Pope, this narrative contends, the spread of print and lapse of licensing had rendered superfluous a manuscript world of scurrilous libels, courtly poetry, and weekly newsletters.

    But a growing body of research is arguing for the ongoing importance of manuscript production and publication into the Romantic period, […]

    after
  • Apr
    17
    2015
    What is a Book? A Symposium on Bibliographic Research (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, with additional support from Denison Library and the Scripps College English Department
    Holbein Room, Ella Strong Denison Library, Scripps College

    Humanities research requires the study of books, but we often confront the limits of this category. This symposium will bring together area scholars, librarians, and students enrolled in the Scripps College course ENGL 197 to consider the question: What is a book?

    Organized by RBS-Mellon Fellow Marissa Nicosia (Scripps College, English) and featuring (among others) RBS-Mellon Fellows Glenda Goodman and Rachael Scarborough King. See the event website for additional details.

    This event is sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, with additional support from Denison Library and the Scripps College English Department. […]

    whatbook
  • Apr 9
    /
    Apr 10
    2015
    Materialities of American Texts and Visual Cultures (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University, the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Columbia University, The Bibliographical Society of America, and the American Printing History Association
    Columbia University

    From current historical work on material and visual cultures, to anthropological research on the social life of things and new approaches to seeing and reading in historical scholarship, the study of the physical evidence of culture has become a pressing issue. This interdisciplinary symposium will bring together conservators, curators, and scholars of art history, literary studies, book history and bibliography to reflect on the historical relation between materials, objects, and practices and different forms of visual and textual production in nineteenth-century America.

  • Apr 2
    /
    Apr 3
    2015
    Bureaucracy and the Organization of Knowledge (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the University of North Texas English Department, History Department, College of Arts and Sciences, and Honors College
    University of North Texas

    Bureaucracy is everywhere, but it becomes palpable and real for most people when they meet with it in a material, physical form: your birth certificate, a course catalog, the diploma you receive at graduation, the bylaws of a department or professional association, IRS Form 1040, the line at the DMV. This symposium gathers scholars working in the fields of history, library science, digital humanities, material text studies, literature, rhetoric, and the history of science to explore the materiality of bureaucracy.

    The symposium will feature talks and object-oriented workshops by scholars whose work examines the material practices, written forms, […]

    Bureaucracy-posteremail
  • Mar
    31
    2015
    Rematerializing the Classics: New Directions in Book History, Bibliography, and the Study of Antiquity (RBS-Mellon Program)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School, the UC Berkeley Department of Classics, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, and the History of the Book Townsend Center Working Group
    Dwinelle 3335, University of California, Berkeley

    A lecture by RBS-Mellon Fellow Joseph Howley, “Rematerializing the Book in the Roman Empire,” followed by a roundtable discussion with Berkeley faculty on the role of material studies in the field of Classics more generally, and future of materiality and book history in the study of antiquity and after.

  • Mar
    27
    2015
    Architecture of the Book (RBS-Mellon Program)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Yale School of Architecture Ph.D. Dialogue Series
    Beinecke Library, Yale University

    This program consists of two complementary sessions: first, a conversation at the school of architecture that takes seriously the implications of The Architecture of the Book, the title of a retrospective volume recently published by Irma Boom, assessing the engagement of her work with the discipline of architecture and examining its self-conscious relationship to early printed books; and second, a workshop at the Beinecke, during which we look together at a selection of the Beinecke’s early architectural holdings to discuss them not, primarily, as historians, but rather as designers. The sessions pay particular attention to Boom’s resolute commitment to the materiality of the book and to its influence on the form and substance of her design; […]

  • Mar
    18
    2015
    Manuscript Transcribathon

    Presented by: RBS, the UVA English Department's Renaissance Area Group, and the Folger Shakespeare Library
    Alderman Library 421

    Join Rare Book School, the UVA English Department’s Renaissance Area Group, and the Folger Shakespeare Library for a Transcribathon. Learn from Folger Curator of Manuscripts Heather Wolfe about paleography and transcription of early modern English documents, and have a go at it yourself using special transcription software developed at the Folger.

  • Nov 11
    /
    Nov 12
    2014
    Popular Literacy During the High Middle Ages (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Cornell University Medieval Studies Program
    Cornell University

    A two-day symposium focusing on the question of popular literacy during the High Middle Ages, featuring a public lecture and Q&A by Professor Carol Symes (University of Illinois), followed by a workshop for students and faculty.

    Sponsored by the Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Cornell University Medieval Studies Program. […]

  • Oct
    24
    2014
    Making Publics: The Past, Present & Future of Publication (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; the Stanford Humanities Center; the Departments of History, English, Religious Studies, Classics, and Communication; the Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies; the Program in Modern Thought and Literature; the Program in History & Philosophy of Science; and the Stanford University Libraries
    Stanford Humanities Center, Stanford University

    How are texts, images, and messages transmitted to their audiences? How does the material form of a message influence and control its reception? How have online and digital publishers used data to respond to and shape their audiences and consumers? “Making Publics: The Past, Present & Future of Publication” will bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars for a one-day conference to explore the materiality and meanings of texts, and how they have been, are, and will be published. The conference will be aimed at developing a longue durée narrative of the relationship between media and audiences in a global context. […]

  • May 15
    /
    May 15
    2014
    Composition: Making Meaning through Design (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; UCSB College of Creative Studies; UCSB Department of the History of Art and Architecture; UCSB Department of English; UCSB Department of History; UCSB Department of Germanic, Slavic, and Semitic Studies; UCSB Interdisciplinary Humanities Center
    University of California, Santa Barbara

    An interdisciplinary symposium that asks how design features (such as format, material, type font/ script, and imagery, to name but a few) can alter, enhance, or otherwise affect the transmission of meaning and shape a text’s use. This symposium aims to bring together scholars from a wide range of disciplinary perspectives in order to promote engaging new dialogues in book history. […]

  • Mar 27
    /
    Apr 24
    2014
    Working with Digitized Manuscripts: New Approaches to Old Sources (RBS-Mellon Event)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School and the Huntington-USC Early Modern Studies Institute
    University of Southern California

    A series of two lectures and discussions on the topic of what digitization means for musicology, with Dorothy Porter of the University of Pennsylvania (“Ceci n’est pas un manuscript: Considering What Digitization Does to Manuscripts”) and Deborah McGrady of the University of Virginia (“Are Digitized Manuscripts Made for Scholarship? The Remediated Codex as the New Object of Medieval Studies”). […]

  • Dec 5
    /
    Dec 6
    2013
    New Media in American Literary History Interdisciplinary Symposium (RBS-Mellon Symposium)

    Presented by: The Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography at Rare Book School; NULab for Texts, Maps and Networks; Northeastern University Humanities Center
    Northeastern University

    A symposium aimed at bringing together “digital” and “analog” scholars interested in the history of American print media to discuss common questions and challenges, and to identify potential collaborations. The goal of the conference is to bridge the gap between digital and more “traditional” disciplinary work by putting scholars employing methodologies such as text mining, topic modeling, digital curation, and network analysis—in other words, “big humanities data”—into direct and productive dialogue with Americanist scholars, graduate students, and archivists employing well-established practices in book history, textual analysis, media studies, and critical bibliography in their work. […]